Blue Mountain Trails


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As a kind of part two to my earlier post about our stay in the blue mountains, here are some favourite photos from the trails around Holywell. They were much too interesting not be awarded a post of their own, and it was a great excuse to use my macro lens.

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Many of the Holywell trails are steep and up and down paths that cut through the hillside.  Either side of you are jungle, shady nooks and mossy banks, which make the hikes pleasantly cool.

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The minute we entered on to the cabin grounds, we were approached by a salesman selling raspberries. I had heard they grew up here and was planning on picking some myself, but when I saw how I would have to scramble down steep trail banks to get them it certainly seemed worth buying them rather than getting a broken ankle.  This went against my hunter-gatherer instinct but it was probably a smart decision.  When I told the sales guy that picking them looked a bit risky, he said, “I know what you mean. That’s why I have my own plants at my house!”

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January felt like a kind of Spring here, with baby fern shoots everywhere.  I wonder if you can eat them like fiddlehead fern soup?…

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…in fact ferns cover most of the jungle floor.  I loved how they made cooling, shady umbrellas.

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And you know when you’ve reached a certain elevation…there they are: pine trees.

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A typical view across from the trail.  I want to go and visit that house!

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What looks like some kind of bearded moss parasite draped trees everywhere on the mountainside.  It added a spooky air, but it did make me worry about the health of the trees?

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One of the Holywell cabins is called “hotlips” and of course my mind went to Major Hoolihan from Mash.  In fact, the cabin wasn’t named after what might go on inside, the name hotlips actually comes from a local plant whose flower looks like a pair of lipsticked lips.  See the resemblance?

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2 thoughts on “Blue Mountain Trails

  1. We too have moss on our trees in BC usually on the north facing side which I’ve heard isn’t a problem – – however the moss you got a shot of does look different like a diseased moss. What a beautiful area that looks like!

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  2. Pingback: Sign Language: Put on the Red Light… | Wright Outta Nowhere

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