Sign Language: Put on the Red Light…


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Its been a while since I’ve found an interesting subject for Sign Language until I spotted this one. There’s a small town called Red Light on the road half way up the mountain towards Holywell, one of those very respectable “blink and you miss it” places gathered around a small community church. If you look closely you will see this double-sided sign on the roadside, serving as both a welcome and a goodbye notice to drivers passing through on the narrow, windy road. Now I have to ask myself “why is this Red Light district” and not “Red Light town” or simply “Red Light?”  Is this a nod to the history of the place, or an innocent coincidence? The charming care that someone has taken to decorate the sign with flowers adds to the intrigue a little when you realize that the flowers illustrated are the indigenous “hot lips” (see my earlier Holywell post) because they resemble a sexy woman’s lips.  Mmmmh.   Is there a connection?  Did the town really get it name from ladies of the night?  Or some other way?  How intriguing to see a sign that seems to focus on its shady history and encourage visitors to “walk, drive & ride safely” at the same time.  Someone needs to explain this to me!

2 thoughts on “Sign Language: Put on the Red Light…

  1. We are just back from a 3-week-roundtrip around Jamaica and we passed this sign a few times too. Even when I saw it, I had a song into my head… right:
    Roxanne
    You don’t have to put on the red light
    Those days are over
    You don’t have to sell your body to the night

    Roxanne
    You don’t have to wear that dress tonight
    Walk the streets for money
    You don’t care if it’s wrong or if it’s right…

    May be the reason it’s written “destrict”, we should blame on the Jamaicans humor and witticism… 😀

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    • I did sing that song in my head when I saw it! Also, I have since learnt the history of name. Higher up the mountain road is an army camp that used to come down the hill to visit the ladies in the village. So, it did get its name from servicing the soldiers, but that was a long time ago and the village has since become respectable — but they kept the name!

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